Search for ‘experience’

There are 50 entries matching ‛experience’:


  • Users don’t care where they are

    Mark Hurst tell us that users don’t care where they are and that breadcrumbs are nice but irrelevent. Peter Merholz wholeheartedly disagrees and Christina Wodtke provides a little balance to the argument. Incidentally, Dan Cederholm has posed the question, how best…

  • UX London 2010 is go!

    Tickets for UX London 2010 are now on sale with a massive £200 early bird discount. Highlights for 2010 include Bill Moggridge, Scott McCloud, Kristina Halvorson & JJG to name a few. Last year sold out and was hugely over subscribed so get in quick!

  • Making sense of Radiohead

    There’s a really interesting post on Creating Passionate Users right now: it explains how seeing Radiohead play live – for one fan – changed how she listens to, and hears the album Kid A. I had a similar experience.

  • I go to Ikea so you don’t have to

    I think there is universal agreement that going to Ikea is both a tortuous and torturous experience, and testament to that is the very existence of a successful business created to circumvent that pain.

  • Observation

    Heaps and heaps of photos from around Brighton. Taken over the last 20 years they are the kind that focus upon what is extraordinary in the everyday. Found at bluejoh, a fellow Brighton blogger who met Some-bloke Tom at a wedding, only she didn’t realize at the time. One…

  • Viral mystery

    Would you believe this site is for a directory enquiries company (requires Flash and sound)? Make sure you check out their spoof of the Honda ‘Cog’ commercial, which in itself is based on Der Lauf der Dinge by Peter Fischli and David Weiss. And if you liked that,…

  • 18 months of beagle ownership

    Poppy is 1½ today. She’s my first dog and, it’s been a wonderful, if occasionally trying experience for both Her Indoors and me.

  • Swiss cheese?

    I enjoy minimal design, and I also believe that, for the majority of commercial and otherwise meaningful sites on the Web, that is exactly what is required. But minimal design to me, does not mean no graphics, no Flash, etc. If these elements are seen to add to the experience…

  • Toons

    BlogAmp is a free Winamp plugin that allows you to publish details of songs being played. I will be playing with it soon. This week Jakob tells us how to become Usability professionals, just like him. Experience is the key, my friend. Nick Usborne writes copy for web sites;…

  • Professional body for web designers

    Mark Boulton has written a thoughtful post on having a professional body for web design. I commented in detail there, but I wanted to expand my thoughts on the subject, particularly on certification and the need for such an organisation.

  • Easier searching

    Well, having implemented my own search engine for clagnut, I’ve just discovered (via Dean) that MySQL now has its own search engine built in: As of Version 3.23.23, MySQL has support for full-text indexing and searching. I suppose I should be pleased and excited that…

  • Get geeked

    For those budding (and indeed established) geeks out there, a few resources from O’Reilly to get you off on the right foot: Alphabetical Directory of Linux Commands. All the way from agetty to znew – a very handy command-line companion with all options…

  • dConstruct 2007

    I’ve just come back from holiday, and the Clearleft office is a-buzz with early preparations for this year’s dConstruct conference.

  • Multimap is hiring

    Multimap is looking to hire a junior web designer/developer to assist the Multimap.com public site development team. The job is based in London.

  • Perfect client

    Discussion on the perfect client, demonstrated by a great little project we did for the IBM GCat team.

  • Right click

    Some gizmos for improving your IE5 experience. Particularly helpful for developers. Google toolbar – quicker searching, page ranking etc. Validate HTML – using WDG validator. Disable style sheets – toggle CSS to check accessibility. Web Developer Accessories…

  • Career path for web designers

    In my post on creating a professional body for web designers I suggested that a function should be to help with the ‘continued professional development’. Christina Wodtke has been considering options for extending one’s career as a web designer.

  • Upgrade some more!

    Zeldman has added his thoughts to the Upgrade Now message debate [inner-self jigs around the office, singing ‘I got a link from Zeldman’]. With the demise of 4.0 browsers and that fact that fewer and fewer clients insist on giving those users exactly the same…

  • It’s time to stop teaching web skills like it’s still 1999

    Design Week had an editorial highlighting the demise of craft skills and typography in college curricula. It reminded me that courses teaching web design in the UK rarely include such skills in the first place. So where are the good courses?

  • Yahoogle!

    Yahoo! is becoming less and less relevant by the day, as it relies more and more on Google. From the Yahoo! Help pages: You may have noticed that the Yahoo! Search results look a little different. As part of our ongoing efforts to offer you the easiest and most rewarding…

  • The user-centred aesthetic

    So far this year, my regular reads on the Web have covered techniques in all the disciplines required to create quality web sites. All the disciplines bar one, that is. What’s missing? The visual design; the look; the skin; the surface. While the folks I’ve been…

  • Site Indexes

    In a recent Friday Feast, Shirley notes that the new version of A List Apart could benefit from having a site index. A site index is a book-style alphabetical index, such as that compiled by Adaptive Path for PeopleSoft. All information laden sites like ALA would benefit from…

  • Plazes

    Ben Hammersley points us to Plazes, which claims to be the ‘navigation system for your social life.’

  • Interface widgets

    Christina Wodtke has created Widgetopia, a collection UI elements, and discusses solving user interface problems – by best practice or common practice?

  • The Ampersand Story

    Why and how I put together Ampersand, the UK’s first conference dedicated specifically to web typography.

  • Liquid lunch

    The new issue of Digital Web mag sees Peter-Paul Koch extolling the fine virtues of graceful degradation. That is the honourable action of building web sites that work† on all browsers without worrying if they are pixel perfect. With care, attention & experience this…

  • Naughty use case scenarios

    Adam Greenfield has just published an eye opening article for Vodafone’s Receiver magazine where he perverts our current idea of use cases in favour of ‘designing for deception, dishonesty, and other happy facts of human nature’.

  • The Aeron Experience

    So I just bought a Herman Miller Aeron chair for the home office. Extravagant? Perhaps; but it was it worth it?

  • Talking Type and Design at South by Southwest

    I’m on two proposed panels for SxSW 2010 – please cast a thumbs up in their favour! Also, some typography and other interesting looking panels that caught my eye.

  • The Virgin Media experience

    Today was the one day I needed to work from home. Today was the day Virgin Media decided to suspend my broadband services with no notice and for no apparent reason.

  • textualization

    Just been finishing off a contract left over from before my move to Multimap (going very well thank you). I’m building a site for a client (thanks Carbon) with a traditional heirarchical navigation, however the client insists that all their navigation be images. Top level…

  • The postcode lookup pattern

    As a way of enabling address input, the UK postcode look-up is fraught with danger and is rarely implemented well. As is often the case in UX design, everything is fine until an exception is reached.

  • More on multi-column layouts

    Since Firefox 1.5 shipped with a partial implementation of the proposed CSS3 Multi-column layout module, it’s received a fair bit of attention…

  • Real life savings through Web standards

    Following on from Doug Bowman’s recent article on potential bandwidth savings for Microsoft, in which he recounts using CSS to rebuild Microsoft’s home page, I’d like to restate here the points I made in my Ten Questions interview with the Web Standards Group.…

  • A new year, a new design

    To my surprise, Clagnut.com was last redesigned in September 2008. Well, it’s all change, with a new redesign launched today. It’s been created from the typography outwards, responsive from the beginning and elegant on huge as well as tiny screens.

  • One year on and what next for remote working?

    Since the UK locked down 52 weeks ago, Clearleft folks have been working fully remotely. As the vaccine works its magic, in a few months time we’ll be able to move back into our studio. What happens then?

  • A View on the Ocean

    And so to another site launch – I hereby present A View on the Ocean, an artist’s journal; a diaristic collection of photographs, comments, stories and music by photographer Andrew Robert Fox.

  • Links from Future of Web Design

    FOWD last wednesday was an enjoyable affair. I didn’t get a huge amount out of the conference itself, but there was some good stuff and I culled a few good links along the way.

  • Photo fades and then some

    Scott Upton of Couloir has taken things to the next level with a resizing, fading JavaScript slideshow. I’ve made some bookmarking and accessibility suggestions (picking nits as usual).

  • The best compostable Nespresso capsules

    Searching for a rich, bold, chocolatey Nespresso coffee, ethically sourced, and home-compostable pods, I tried 17 different coffees from 5 different brands until finally I came across two which hit the mark.

  • I ran a marathon

    Last Sunday I completed the inaugural Brighton marathon. It was a great day, for a good cause.

  • A couple of accessibility studies

    One by Joe Clark on screen-reader usability at a redesigned, standards-compliant e-commerce site. The other by Russ Weakley and Roger Hudson on the real world interpretation of HTML table mark-up by assistive devices.

  • But why, some say, the moon?

    Returning from speaking at the Web App Summit, we watched the brilliant Frost/Nixon and I was reminded of JFK’s fantastic 1962 Moon speech to Rice University.

  • Conference diversity from an organiser’s perspective

    Clearleft we know we have a responsibility to the industry to help redress the gender balance, and that means putting together diverse line-ups at our conferences. This is much easier said than done, but difficult doesn’t mean impossible.

  • The good, the bad & the funny

    Netscape’s DevEdge has been redesigned as a standards showcase. Yes, another important web site has been redesigned and built without table-layout. Visually, it’s hardly cutting edge, but is easy on both the eye and the mouse. The drop down menus are rather splendid…

  • Glaucoma and photography

    Sorry not some wonderful cure, but instead a few sites that might be of interest: an great looking, accessible charity site and some approachs to presenting photos on web pages.

  • d.Construct schedule and podcast

    As you’ve probably heard by now, we at Clearleft are organising another d.Construct conference, set for Friday 8th September this year. We’ve just released the schedule and published a podcast.

  • WebKit now supports CSS @font-face rules

    Earlier this week it was announced that WebKit now supports CSS @font-face rules. There has been a mixed reception in some quarters, but this leap forward (for that’s what it is) has to be a good thing.