Search for ‘AListApart’

There are 37 entries matching ‛AListApart’:


  • A List Apart returns

    Every Web designer’s favourite online magazine is back! Yep, A List Apart has returned and it’s looking lush with three top new articles from Dave Shea, Joe Clark and Dan Benjamin.

  • An ambition realised

    I’ve been an avid reader of A List Apart for many years. It’s been a long-standing source of information, inspiration and even spiritual guidance. And so it is with immense pleasure and pride that I can finally say that I am an ALA author.

  • @media

    This week’s ALA shows how to conceive and design print style sheets that automatically format web content for off-screen delivery. Includes tips on hiding inappropriate content, styling text for the printer, and displaying the URL of every link on the page.

  • A List Apart web design survey

    As noted by Zeldman, there is a strange absence of data about the web design industry. A List Apart has set about trying to change that, resulting in the Web Design Survey. If you’re a web designer of any description, you should fill it out.

  • In a pickle

    A List Apart explains a great time management system for those that can’t be bothered with time management systems. The gist is to schedule in the critical tasks of the day and fill in the gaps with all the rest (email, site maintenance, phone calls, reading ALA, etc.).…

  • spam and stuff

    A List Apart has a geeky double issue which has partly pissed me off. On the good side there’s a pretty good attempt to prevent spam bots reading email addresses which uses JavaScript and character encoding. On the disappointing side is an article explaining how to…

  • Top blog tips

    Every now and then, ALA runs an article which further cements the strong relationship between its readers and its authors (who, I suspect, are also readers). I’m talking about the kind of cosy (in its most positive sense) article, written by someone who clearly gets the…

  • CSS crib sheets

    Another CSS crib sheet (on centering divs) from Andy Budd and a first A List Apart article (on creating a JavaScript image gallery) from Jeremy Keith.

  • Baselines and vertical rhythm

    Interest in Web typography has really picked up over the past year. One subject in particular has piqued people’s interest: vertical rhythm and alignment of baselines. Here’s a compilation of tutorials on the subject.

  • More on multi-column layouts

    Since Firefox 1.5 shipped with a partial implementation of the proposed CSS3 Multi-column layout module, it’s received a fair bit of attention…

  • XMaLarkey

    Grant Hutchinson provides a bunch of extremely useful RSS links. ’Cos I intend to follow the herd at some point and get this blog syndicateable. Bob Sawyer gives us a dead handy XHTML meta tag generator. David Eisenberg creates an XML-based markup language from scratch…

  • Don’t break the back button!

    The new W3C Validator has come out of beta and released unto the world. There is an improved UI and loads of links to the Specs, as well as help, documentation, tips and improved accessibility (accesskeys a-plenty). There also seems to have been a few changes to the…

  • Transparently brilliant

    There’s a fabulous new design in the CSS Zen Garden which makes use of a clever transparent PNG effect.

  • Form layout

    Semantically speaking, should we be using tables to lay out forms, or should we be using some other mark-up combined with CSS? There arguments for both, but I reckon the most flexible answer is hidden in HTML 2.

  • Google’s Smart Tags

    Remember the brou ha ha when Microsoft announced its Smart Tags? Smart Tags would automatically add links into your documents, whether you liked it or not. Well Zeldman reports that the latest Google toolbar does exactly that, for example a street address will link to Google…

  • Fontastic

    Survey of installed fonts on different platforms, Mark Newhouse’s real world CSS and the Polar Bear 2 is in beta.

  • Recent mark-up chatter

    I’ve contributed my two penn’orth to a couple of interesting HTML related posts.

  • It’s an honour to be nominated… once more

    As in previous years, Clagnut has been lucky enough to be nominated in the Best Personal Site and Blogs category of the Brighton and Hove Web Awards 2006. Voting closes on Wednesday 8 November so hurry along and vote!

  • BBC News Online Wikiproxy

    Stefan’s Wikiproxy of BBC News Online which, among other things, links all Capitalised Phrases to their associated entry in Wikipedia.

  • Site Indexes

    In a recent Friday Feast, Shirley notes that the new version of A List Apart could benefit from having a site index. A site index is a book-style alphabetical index, such as that compiled by Adaptive Path for PeopleSoft. All information laden sites like ALA would benefit from…

  • Strictly necessary?

    Dan’s latest SimpleQuiz asks the question ‘When using the XHTML 1.0 Strict doctype, how would you launch links in a new window?.’ The problem to overcome is that the target attribute is deprecated and not available in XHTML 1.0 Strict. We’re not talking…

  • Enabling .htaccess in OS X

    Out of the box, the Apache Web server that comes with OS X does not take any notice of .htaccess files. It took me a while to figure out how to get them working, so I thought I’d share.

  • Pop off

    The welcome demise of the pop-up, and some welcome alternatives.

  • Easy alpha transparent pngs

    The BritPack logo on these pages is an alpha-transparent PNG and I use a little PHP script to deliver browser-specific code to IE6 and IE5.5 and a normal image to other browsers.

  • Apostrophe s

    Why is the humble apostrophe so regularly misused and why are hairdressers so often the culprits? Ladie’s perm’s at half price (As the Guardian readers’ editor points out, journalists who should know better also get it wrong.) Apostrophes have two…

  • Upgrade now!

    A discussion of the Upgrade Your Browser message so often placed at the top of web pages which can only displayed as intended by browsers with good CSS capabilities. Personally I find find it annoying…

  • jQuery for UX Designers

    I’m giving a virtual seminar on using jQuery in interactive wireframes. As a UX designer, it’s the course I wish had been available to me a few years ago.

  • Variable fixed width layout

    There’s a different approach to web page layout which is gradually getting some traction. The idea is that the layout is changed to best accommodate the window size.

  • SxSW 2007 wrap up

    It’s Sunday and it finally feels like I’ve caught up sleep and got over jet lag, thus enabling me to attempt a personal wrap up of my South by Southwest.

  • The state of accessibility in the real world

    One of the prime reasons for going to @media was to learn more from recognised experts in the field of accessibility, and yet I came away confused and disillusioned about the state of the things.

  • Glaucoma and photography

    Sorry not some wonderful cure, but instead a few sites that might be of interest: an great looking, accessible charity site and some approachs to presenting photos on web pages.

  • Lists, lists & more lists

    A discussion of the recent prevalence and possible overuse of heavily styled lists for such elements as site navigation and overall blog structure.

  • How to size text using ems

    Text for the screen is sized with CSS in terms of pixels, ems or keywords. Pixels is easy, keywords are well documented. That leaves ems. I will now attempt to show you how ems can be as quick and easy to use as pixels.