Search for ‘text rendering’

There are 50 entries matching ‛text rendering’:


  • Chrome just got darker

    A couple of days ago, my installation of Google Chrome updated itself from version 49 to version 50. The timing was fortuitous and relieved me of a growing text rendering headache.

  • Problems with font rendering on Macs

    Just recently Jeffrey Zeldman was bemoaning the sub-standard state of text rendering in Firefox on a Mac. And the sad truth is he only skimmed the surface; Firefox, Safari, Opera and Camino may render even the same font differently.

  • New browsers

    Some recent browser releases: Mozilla has released 1.3 Alpha and 1.02. Opera has released 7 for Windows Beta 2. Apple has released Safari Beta 2. For web developers, the last one is of particular note as Safari will presumably be making its way on to all new Apple machines. …

  • Hyphens a soft problem

    Typographers divide words using hyphens to increase readability. All books and newspapers of any quality use this technique to ‘justify’ their text, yet it is not a tool available to Web designers in any useful form.

  • Dasher

    Dasher is the most incredible writing interface I think I’ve ever seen. Dasher is a zooming interface. You point where you want to go, and the display zooms in wherever you point. The world into which you are zooming is painted with letters, so that any point you zoom…

  • Web Essentials blog

    Web Essentials is almost upon us and now it has a blog. On a vaguely related note, CSS Vault recently pointed to some demonstrations of CSS in scientific web publishing in particular rendering mathematical expressions.

  • JavaScript-enhanced image replacement

    Most image replacement techniques work by displaying a background image of text and shifting the real text out of view which is fine unless you have images turned off. This can be addressed with some unobtrusive JavaScript.

  • Boxed in

    “You can’t get an XBox, it’s a big, ugly, tacky hulk of shit. Who cares about the technical stuff and what the games are like? What counts is what they look like when switched off and stowed in the corner.”

  • Seven

    Netscape have released a Version 7 preview. Still based on the Gecko rendering engine driving Netscape 6 with a few added features. While we’re on the subject, for a bit of fun trying downloading on old Navigator from the browser archive at evolt.

  • Fixing this, sliding that

    Redesigned si-blog uses some cool position-fixed tricks to selectively scroll text over or under an banner. Also, a nifty child-selector sends a gif to IE and a superior PNG to better browsers.

  • Fixed width

    Interesting that recently Stopdesign and Simplebits have both subtly redesigned to be fixed width – moving away form their previous liquid designs. I’d love to know why.

  • When good type goes bad

    Jakob mourns the demise of the text sizing buttons IE but fails to point out that it won’t have any effect on a Windows machine if text is sized in pixels. Microsoft have stopped giving away their free web fonts.

  • Textilisation

    Clagnut now uses a slightly customised version of Dean Allen’s wonderful Textile. Textile provides speedier text input (without having to mark up the input into my CMS) and formats the text nicely, with proper “typographer’s quotes” and so on. There…

  • textualization

    Just been finishing off a contract left over from before my move to Multimap (going very well thank you). I’m building a site for a client (thanks Carbon) with a traditional heirarchical navigation, however the client insists that all their navigation be images. Top level…

  • Get It

    Mozilla 1.0. Stick a fork in it. It’s done and looking good. Posted a few pikkies from the Mini Rally recently held in Brighton. Check out those wonderfully ridiculous chopped cars – why have a small car when you can have a tiny one? Like me, Owen Briggs has been…

  • Full-text searching

    Recently I’ve been playing around with MySQL full-text searching, including integrating it as Clagnut’s search engine. It’s good, but there’s a few limitations I had to get around.

  • How to size text using ems

    Text for the screen is sized with CSS in terms of pixels, ems or keywords. Pixels is easy, keywords are well documented. That leaves ems. I will now attempt to show you how ems can be as quick and easy to use as pixels.

  • Moving CSS typography forward

    The CSS3 font module has come back to life, and web designers have been asked for the their wish lists. Here’s mine.

  • Browser stickies

    Browser Stickies is a little experiment I knocked together in the lull between SxSW Interactive and SxSW Music.

  • PowerNote

    On his tasty new blog, Brendan Dawes extolls the virtues of Apple’s Keynote as a rival PowerPoint. But I’m not convinced.

  • Praise Indeed

    I make no excuse for this piece of flagrant trumpet blowing. Eric Meyer writes: How have I gone this long without encountering Clagnut ? It’s the kind of design that I can sort of vaguely see in my head when I sit down to do something, but when I do it, the end result…

  • Preview and pain

    I’ve built a preview feature for blog comments, to make life easier since incorporating Textile into the commenting system. And talking of Textile, I’m struggling to fix a bug with its @ notation.

  • Comment pushing

    A proposal: if you add a comment to a blog you can choose to be notified when more comments are added to that post. Specifically, you wouldn’t be notified each time a comment is added, just once until you’ve re-visited the post, after which you will be notified…

  • An ambition realised

    I’ve been an avid reader of A List Apart for many years. It’s been a long-standing source of information, inspiration and even spiritual guidance. And so it is with immense pleasure and pride that I can finally say that I am an ALA author.

  • Sitemaps

    I’ve never been a big fan of sitemaps on Web sites, perhaps because I’ve too often seen them done badly. A recent Boxes & Arrows article explains how to do them properly.

  • CSS & Accessibility

    Here’s something that’s been playing on my mind recently. What role can CSS alone play in making websites accessible?

  • @media

    This week’s ALA shows how to conceive and design print style sheets that automatically format web content for off-screen delivery. Includes tips on hiding inappropriate content, styling text for the printer, and displaying the URL of every link on the page.

  • Gruber’s footnotes

    I just noticed the way John Gruber handles footnotes on Daring Fireball. In particular the little arrow appended to the footnote which sends readers back to their place in the text.

  • Form layout

    Semantically speaking, should we be using tables to lay out forms, or should we be using some other mark-up combined with CSS? There arguments for both, but I reckon the most flexible answer is hidden in HTML 2.

  • HTML is better than XHTML

    Judging by the latest SitePoint TechTimes, it seems Stuart Langridge has won the argument. SitePoint’s DHTML book will be published with HTML.

  • Eliminating inline styles

    This week’s MCU web access tip recommends placing printable characters between adjacent links (such as in horizontal navigation). The tip suggests hiding the printable character using spans and inline styles. I show how to do it a little better.

  • Mark-up tactics

    Your mantra for today: ditch divs and eliminate ids for leaner, more meaningful mark-up. Now before you turn away, branding me as a slave to semantics, I will explain some of the common misconceptions to show how the number of divs and ids can easily be reduced.

  • IE6 bug

    The way I’ve coded the Clagnut CSS shows up a bug in IE6 Win. All the left and right margins (actually padding) around my text are doubled in width for no apparent reason. In fact it’s not even that straightforward – the page isn’t rendered consistently…

  • More on multi-column layouts

    Since Firefox 1.5 shipped with a partial implementation of the proposed CSS3 Multi-column layout module, it’s received a fair bit of attention…

  • The state of accessibility in the real world

    One of the prime reasons for going to @media was to learn more from recognised experts in the field of accessibility, and yet I came away confused and disillusioned about the state of the things.

  • Use rems for global sizing, use ems for local sizing

    An unedited extract from my forthcoming book, Web Typography. This chapter is quite technically focussed and hopefully stands well on its own. The other chapters I’ve written contain much higher proportion of typographic theory.

  • Easier searching

    Well, having implemented my own search engine for clagnut, I’ve just discovered (via Dean) that MySQL now has its own search engine built in: As of Version 3.23.23, MySQL has support for full-text indexing and searching. I suppose I should be pleased and excited that…

  • Curvacious

    Web designers are forever sticking curves in their designs, particularly when smoothing corners of boxes. Designers have good reasons for this, but those of us charged with building the reality find it a pain in the bum, usually having to resort to tables to quickly get the job…

  • Real life savings through Web standards

    Following on from Doug Bowman’s recent article on potential bandwidth savings for Microsoft, in which he recounts using CSS to rebuild Microsoft’s home page, I’d like to restate here the points I made in my Ten Questions interview with the Web Standards Group.…

  • Secure wifi

    During another Geekend in London, Andy brought up the question of how to make his home wifi network secure but open. Well, it?s funny how these things work out: upon catching up with my RSS feeds, there lay the answer.

  • All you need to know about hyphenation in CSS

    Automatic hyphenation on the web has been possible since 2011 and is now broadly supported. There is however far more control available to designers than just turning on hyphens.

  • Centering text on the longest line

    The Web Typography project continues to proceed, albeit at a glacial pace. One of the reasons for the slow progress is guidelines such as this: “verse quotations should be centered on the longest line”.

  • Don’t break the back button!

    The new W3C Validator has come out of beta and released unto the world. There is an improved UI and loads of links to the Specs, as well as help, documentation, tips and improved accessibility (accesskeys a-plenty). There also seems to have been a few changes to the…