Search for ‘semantic HTML’

There are 50 entries matching ‛semantic HTML’:


  • What’s in a word?

    @media wrapped up with a Hot Topics discussion panel. One of the hot topics suggested by an attendee was ‘semantics’. There seems to be something of an obsession with the word in web circles.

  • Multimap redesign

    I’ve been somewhat quiet of late, which as usual means busy, busy, busy. And without further ado, the fruits of my labour can be found at Multimap.com – a complete rebuild using Web standards, semantic HTML and CSS layout.

  • Speaking browsers

    Eric Meyer recently posted Don’t Read; Speak!, from which I quote: [S]creen readers need to become speaking browsers: they need to ignore how the page is visually displayed, and read the content. Use semantic markup when it exists, and otherwise [...] ignore the…

  • CSS Naked Day

    Today, April 5th, is CSS Naked Day. This means that if you are reading this on the website and not via RSS, what you are seeing is Clagnut with the CSS stripped off.

  • CSS Tutorials

    I’ve been following Simon Willison’s ongoing CSS Tutorials with great interest. He’s so far covered styling blockquotes with big quotation marks, a CSS version of jwz which gaves us a bunch of IE5 workarounds, a remake of scripting.com to introduce the…

  • Skills swapped

    Last night, I enjoyed the SkillSwap presentation by Jeremy on ‘CSS based design’. There was a full house, with folks representing disciplines from techie to Flash, and I reckon everyone took away a lot from the talk. Interestingly, a good deal of time was spent…

  • A couple of accessibility studies

    One by Joe Clark on screen-reader usability at a redesigned, standards-compliant e-commerce site. The other by Russ Weakley and Roger Hudson on the real world interpretation of HTML table mark-up by assistive devices.

  • Real life savings through Web standards

    Following on from Doug Bowman’s recent article on potential bandwidth savings for Microsoft, in which he recounts using CSS to rebuild Microsoft’s home page, I’d like to restate here the points I made in my Ten Questions interview with the Web Standards Group.…

  • Findability

    Peter Morville, co-author of the classic Polar Bear book, has recently launched Findability, a portal to anything and anyone related to findability. Or as Morville puts it: [A] complex query, run against the brains of users, who will hopefully contribute additional ideas,…

  • corned beef

    Argentina 0 : England 1. Need I say more? Nice to see Tyson’s taken a pasting too.

  • Users don’t care where they are

    Mark Hurst tell us that users don’t care where they are and that breadcrumbs are nice but irrelevent. Peter Merholz wholeheartedly disagrees and Christina Wodtke provides a little balance to the argument. Incidentally, Dan Cederholm has posed the question, how best…

  • Accents in alerts

    Ever needed to put accented characters such as é into a JavaScript alert? It’s surprisingly problematic.

  • HTML is better than XHTML

    Judging by the latest SitePoint TechTimes, it seems Stuart Langridge has won the argument. SitePoint’s DHTML book will be published with HTML.

  • When good lists go bad

    First off, the css-discuss mailing list now has a searchable online archive. It’s high traffic, extremely high quality and will almost certainly already contain an answer to your CSS problems. Here are a few gems I discovered there regarding the problems with styling…

  • Pushing CSS

    Introducing Position is Everything and CSS Destory, a couple of CSS resources exploring bugs and extremes.

  • HTML Entity Character Lookup

    HTML Entity Character Lookup is a little free webapp and comes a Dashboard widget too, which is super-handy.

  • What’s the difference between a blog and a news site?

    A question asked of me by a non-blogging friend. Other than content emphasis, he could see little difference, and thinking about it neither could I. (Which might explain why RSS, originally developed for news feeds, has been so whole heartedly taken on board in the…

  • A grave loss

    Galen Rowell has died aged 61. He and his wife Barbara were killed in a plane crash in California. Rowell was probably the most famous outdoor photographer in the world, regularly shooting features for National Geographic during a life spent travelling in remote countries…

  • Rewrite

    At the moment, I’m attempting to completely rewrite the HTML and CSS beneath clagnut.

  • Free reader

    FeedReader is a nifty freeware RSS reader for Windows. Speaking of RSS, kindly read today’s Dive Into Mark on that subject [thanks to Zeldman].

  • DevEdge dead?

    Anyone know if it’s permanent and where the sidebar might be replicated?

  • City of Sound

    City of Sound is a new addition to my blog roll. Written by Dan Hill, it’s a London-centric weblog with a somewhat grand raison d’être.

  • Johnny Cash dies

    The country music legend died in Nashville, Tennessee, aged 71. I started listening to Johnny Cash only very recently, having heard his wonderful covers of non-country songs such has Depeche Mode’s Personal Jesus. The Guardian has a feature entitled Five extraordinary…

  • CSS tabs

    Mark Pilgrim recently published his version of tabs build with HTML lists and CSS. So I thought I’d publish my version of as well.

  • Now it’s the other pier

    Brighton’s other pier, the Palace Pier, has now suffered it’s own disaster, catching fire in a rather big way. Sad as it is, I haven’t got quite as much sympathy with the Palace Pier as I do with the West Pier. The Palace Pier is nowhere near as old, and is…

  • Safari 1.3

    Those of you who have just updated OS X to 10.3.9 may have noticed that Safari is now a full point release older at 1.3. And this means that the clear:none bug I reported a year ago is finally fixed. In fairness Dave Hyatt fixed this bug ages ago but he’s had to wait…

  • Naughty but nice

    Something of an exclusive: AOL are definitely moving over to the Gecko (Mozilla, Netscape 6+, etc.) engine. There’s been rumours, but how do I know for sure? Because AOL are making sure the most popular sites work with Gecko before they make the switch; remember I said we…

  • Crunch

    The real reason the West Pier collapsed. Nice one Bricey. More on the Glasshaus collapse. It seems that Wrox’s parent company, Peer Information, is the one to be liquidated, along with all its assets. Many ex-employees have posted their details on Graphic Design…

  • Linkorama

    I have rediscovered the long-forgotten link tag. Use it to make your site more accessible.

  • New browsers

    Some recent browser releases: Mozilla has released 1.3 Alpha and 1.02. Opera has released 7 for Windows Beta 2. Apple has released Safari Beta 2. For web developers, the last one is of particular note as Safari will presumably be making its way on to all new Apple machines. …

  • Preview and pain

    I’ve built a preview feature for blog comments, to make life easier since incorporating Textile into the commenting system. And talking of Textile, I’m struggling to fix a bug with its @ notation.

  • Bring on Brazil!

    So England are through 3–0 against the Danes. Watched the matched in a packed The Greys, a fantastic little pub in Hanover with some great Belgian beers. I digress. I’m really enjoying The Guardian’s coverage of the World Cup. They have a great feature –…

  • Why oh why?

    Scene 360 asks the question of twenty three top zines and design portals: Why do you do it? A beautifully put together piece with some fascinating insight into how the likes of K10K and Design is Kinky think. The Evolution of Type, a fine introduction to the origins, evolution…

  • Microformats for business owners

    An explanation of the practical benefits that microformats can bring to a business and its customers, written with the business owner in mind.”

  • A sad loss

    It seems that Glasshaus, publisher of some great web design books, has gone out of business. The rumour is that their parent company, Wrox Press, is broke, so all the publishing houses below them are gone as well. Glasshaus weren’t around for long, but managed to capture…

  • Ecstatic

    What a couple of days it’s been for Champions League football. As Chelsea finally beat Arsenal after 17 previous attempts I was whirling around like a dervish, veins coursing with adrenalin and endorphins.

  • Internet Explorer 7 will have fixes

    Over on the ‘official’ IEBlog, Chris Wilson confirms that support for PNG alpha channels and some CSS fixes, in particular the peekaboo and guillotine bugs, have been added to IE7 beta 1. Bring on max-width and friends.

  • Upgrade some more!

    Zeldman has added his thoughts to the Upgrade Now message debate [inner-self jigs around the office, singing ‘I got a link from Zeldman’]. With the demise of 4.0 browsers and that fact that fewer and fewer clients insist on giving those users exactly the same…

  • BBC News Online Wikiproxy

    Stefan’s Wikiproxy of BBC News Online which, among other things, links all Capitalised Phrases to their associated entry in Wikipedia.

  • Googlewhacking

    Googlewhacking may well be the latest time-wasting trend for Googlenauts, and it’s even more pointless than Googlefight. It is mildly addictive though. One locates a whack by finding two (and only two) words which, when entered into Google , receive a single result.…

  • Form layout

    Semantically speaking, should we be using tables to lay out forms, or should we be using some other mark-up combined with CSS? There arguments for both, but I reckon the most flexible answer is hidden in HTML 2.

  • Playing with Delta

    I recently posted a bunch of photos taken on the South Downs back in late December. I was playing with Ilford Delta 400 film (pushed to 800) for the first time; in fact it was my first time shooting monochrome since college. It was a typically dull winter day, but still…

  • Sad

    It is with much regret that I have to inform you of the demise of linesandsplines. A beautiful intellectual web log dedicated to the joys & aesthetics of typography. Often way above my amateurish knowledge of the subject – but that was the point for me – how…

  • transparent

    Cross-Browser PNG Translucency in the current issue of SitePoint. Useful, but won’t validate: Let’s just hope that Microsoft wise up and support PNG transparency with the standard tag in Internet Explorer 7! Westciv (makers of Style Master) announce the…

  • Vancouver calling

    Lance Arthur tries to persuade his fellow Americans not to move to Canada.

  • Why designers should and shouldn’t code

    At Clearleft, our designers do not mark up their own designs. We require that they can all code well, but they never touch a line of production HTML. Why should our designers be able to code but not be required to do so?