Search for ‘Web standards’

There are 50 entries matching ‛Web standards’:


  • Multimap redesign

    I’ve been somewhat quiet of late, which as usual means busy, busy, busy. And without further ado, the fruits of my labour can be found at Multimap.com – a complete rebuild using Web standards, semantic HTML and CSS layout.

  • Web Standards Awards

    The Web Standards Awards have just launched tp celebrate and encourage CSS-based design. The emphasis will be on commercial sites which is definitely a good thing as the Web design world as a whole has a lot of catching up to do.

  • Web Essentials 04

    Web Essentials 2004 looks to be an inspiring conference on Web standards, and a really good excuse to travel to Syndey late September/October. The conference will cover the key aspects of web standards: accessibility, markup (HTML/XHTML) and presentation (CSS). The…

  • Buy buy

    Boxes & Arrows has a great article on the Principles of Task Flow for Web Applications which outlines the concept of views and forms. All the cool kids are doing it, so why not me. Go and buy Zeldman’s Designing with Web Standards, or better still get your employers…

  • Real life savings through Web standards

    Following on from Doug Bowman’s recent article on potential bandwidth savings for Microsoft, in which he recounts using CSS to rebuild Microsoft’s home page, I’d like to restate here the points I made in my Ten Questions interview with the Web Standards Group.…

  • The devil’s in the minutia

    Zeldman recently opined that, since the mainstreaming of web standards, there should be more talk in design circles of content, design and usability, but then lays into recent round table discussions on HTML, implying they are harmful.

  • Ten questions for Andy

    Brighton blogger and Web designer Andy Budd answers ten questions on topics including standards fascism and the success of Skillswap. Andy also echoing my own feelings on blogging.

  • A couple of accessibility studies

    One by Joe Clark on screen-reader usability at a redesigned, standards-compliant e-commerce site. The other by Russ Weakley and Roger Hudson on the real world interpretation of HTML table mark-up by assistive devices.

  • Mozilla 1.1

    Mozilla 1.1 is now out with some lovely new icons. It also claims to have improved application and layout performance, stability, CSS, DOM and HTML standards support. Official news on the forthcoming all-new Opera 7.

  • Mark-up tactics

    Your mantra for today: ditch divs and eliminate ids for leaner, more meaningful mark-up. Now before you turn away, branding me as a slave to semantics, I will explain some of the common misconceptions to show how the number of divs and ids can easily be reduced.

  • Mozilla is mine

    I have recently come to the conclusion that, as a Windows user, Mozilla has ‘officially’ become my browser of choice. For some time now, we’ve known about its superior support for The Standards, so why has it taken me so long to change? Because at home I…

  • transparent

    Cross-Browser PNG Translucency in the current issue of SitePoint. Useful, but won’t validate: Let’s just hope that Microsoft wise up and support PNG transparency with the standard tag in Internet Explorer 7! Westciv (makers of Style Master) announce the…

  • Upgrade now!

    A discussion of the Upgrade Your Browser message so often placed at the top of web pages which can only displayed as intended by browsers with good CSS capabilities. Personally I find find it annoying…

  • Joe Clark in London

    The fine people at Carson Workshops are flying Joe Clark over to London for a one day workshop, in which Joe will be Sharing the Secrets of Web Accessibility.

  • Multimap is hiring

    Multimap is looking to hire a junior web designer/developer to assist the Multimap.com public site development team. The job is based in London.

  • The good, the bad & the funny

    Netscape’s DevEdge has been redesigned as a standards showcase. Yes, another important web site has been redesigned and built without table-layout. Visually, it’s hardly cutting edge, but is easy on both the eye and the mouse. The drop down menus are rather splendid…

  • CSS Naked Day

    Today, April 5th, is CSS Naked Day. This means that if you are reading this on the website and not via RSS, what you are seeing is Clagnut with the CSS stripped off.

  • Speaking browsers

    Eric Meyer recently posted Don’t Read; Speak!, from which I quote: [S]creen readers need to become speaking browsers: they need to ignore how the page is visually displayed, and read the content. Use semantic markup when it exists, and otherwise [...] ignore the…

  • Frame pain

    Douglas Bowman has been busy with a nice alternative to textual images and a some research into browsers’ treatment of frames given the lack of control provided by HTML standards. The Friday bite of Biscuit: I was just sitting there Eating a salmonella sandwich,

  • TT

    Latest issue of Boxes and Arrows, the redesign of Audi.com. The process explored workgroup software, utilized technology to support the brand ideals and challenged the status quo of current web navigation thinking by proposing a right handed navigation system. Hillman…

  • Web Essentials blog

    Web Essentials is almost upon us and now it has a blog. On a vaguely related note, CSS Vault recently pointed to some demonstrations of CSS in scientific web publishing in particular rendering mathematical expressions.

  • Oh the irony…

    ...the scathing irony. Monday’s WaSP produced the funniest thing I’ve read this year.

  • Accesskey standards

    One of my goals for Clagnut is to make it accessible beyond good alt tags and valid code. Providing keyboard shortcuts through the accesskey attribute for important parts of the site, such as search, help and home, can help. It struck me that there should be consistency in…

  • At @media again

    So I’m off to @media for the rest of this week – can’t wait! And in other news I have an article in this month’s Practical Web Design magazine.

  • Captioning Sucks

    As part of the Open & Closed Project, Joe Clark has released a new site, Captioning Sucks, to highlight the shoddy state of captions in broadcasting. Check out the Comic Sans goodness.

  • Normality returns

    Thanks for your support. I don’t normally get political here at Clagnut, and even less often do I get angry and sweary, so I thought I’d show any new readers what I normally write about, by way of a top ten most visited posts this fortnight.

  • Strictly necessary?

    Dan’s latest SimpleQuiz asks the question ‘When using the XHTML 1.0 Strict doctype, how would you launch links in a new window?.’ The problem to overcome is that the target attribute is deprecated and not available in XHTML 1.0 Strict. We’re not talking…

  • Browse Happ(il)y

    WaSP have just released a minisite, designed by Ethan Marcotte. The purpose of Browse Happy is to spread the message to all and sundry that there are alternative browsers to Internet Explorer.

  • National Organic Week

    I love to cook. Part of the pleasure of cooking is working with fine ingredients which is why I choose to tell you that this week is national organic week.

  • Bulletproof Ajax

    I’m extremely proud to say my esteemed colleague, Jeremy Keith, has finished his latest book, Bulletproof Ajax. Jeremy is also running an Ajax training workshop to coincide with the book launch.

  • TBL versus Eolas

    As Director of the W3C Tim Berners-Lee has written a typically cogent letter to the US Patent and Trademark Office in protest against the Eolas ‘906 Patent.

  • Form layout

    Semantically speaking, should we be using tables to lay out forms, or should we be using some other mark-up combined with CSS? There arguments for both, but I reckon the most flexible answer is hidden in HTML 2.

  • I’m back

    And there are photos. And a list of what’s been happening: Odeon crapsters, AMG retrograde, per-site stylesheets, disabling IE6 imagebar, Mozilla security flaw, Malarkey forms, Colly links, Gmail whitelist, XHTML to RSS and fantasy footie.

  • Whatever happened to font-stretch?

    The font-stretch property was removed from CSS2 in the transition to CSS2.1. Unfortunately this leaves us with a rather gaping hole in overall font support.

  • Deviating from process

    We at Clearleft are starting to enjoy deviating from process. Skipping steps, changing the order, adding extra steps, using different tools. This all keeps us fresh, but it also helps eliminate the production line approach it’s so easy to fall into.

  • Hyphens a soft problem

    Typographers divide words using hyphens to increase readability. All books and newspapers of any quality use this technique to ‘justify’ their text, yet it is not a tool available to Web designers in any useful form.

  • It’s time to stop teaching web skills like it’s still 1999

    Design Week had an editorial highlighting the demise of craft skills and typography in college curricula. It reminded me that courses teaching web design in the UK rarely include such skills in the first place. So where are the good courses?

  • Centering text on the longest line

    The Web Typography project continues to proceed, albeit at a glacial pace. One of the reasons for the slow progress is guidelines such as this: “verse quotations should be centered on the longest line”.

  • Taking on the Tour

    Two remarkable men attempt to ride the Tour course in the same number of days as the race itself. And Jeff’s book is five years old.

  • Glaucoma and photography

    Sorry not some wonderful cure, but instead a few sites that might be of interest: an great looking, accessible charity site and some approachs to presenting photos on web pages.

  • International Standard Serial Number

    A year ago I applied for an ISSN for Clagnut; my request was turned down. Weblogs are eligible for ISSN under the existing guidelines and I explain how there are increasingly compelling practical reasons for assigning ISSN to weblogs.