Search for ‘Mark Boulton’

There are 50 entries matching ‛Mark Boulton’:


  • Speaking on typography at SxSW 2007?

    This year, SxSW Interactive is enabling attendees to vote for panels to be featured in the conference. I’m hoping to present a talk with Mark Boulton called Web Typography Sucks. The Panel Proposal Picker Round Two is now live, so get your votes in!

  • Mac apps Xmas bonanza

    Christmas bargains are upon us, with indie Mac application bundles galore. Also, 24 ways is back for a third year and dConstruct t-shirts are now just a fiver!

  • Website analysis tools

    In recent commentary, people have lumped together Google Analytics, Mint and Measure Map as three new traffic analysis tools all competing with each other. The reality is somewhat different.

  • Talking type at SxSW

    First thing on Tuesday morning, I’ll be presenting Web Typography Sucks with the venerable Mark Boulton. Also that day is Helvetica the Movie. And on Saturday there’s the Great British Booze-up.

  • Why designers should and shouldn’t code

    At Clearleft, our designers do not mark up their own designs. We require that they can all code well, but they never touch a line of production HTML. Why should our designers be able to code but not be required to do so?

  • Form layout

    Semantically speaking, should we be using tables to lay out forms, or should we be using some other mark-up combined with CSS? There arguments for both, but I reckon the most flexible answer is hidden in HTML 2.

  • Professional body for web designers

    Mark Boulton has written a thoughtful post on having a professional body for web design. I commented in detail there, but I wanted to expand my thoughts on the subject, particularly on certification and the need for such an organisation.

  • No such thing as a free breakfast

    Yesterday morning I had a ‘free’ breakfast courtesy of Easynet. BT have finally got around to unbundling the local loop around here and Easynet are cashing in by offering local businesses Broadband for Breakfast™ (yes it is a trade mark). Fellow pillars of…

  • Strictly necessary?

    Dan’s latest SimpleQuiz asks the question ‘When using the XHTML 1.0 Strict doctype, how would you launch links in a new window?.’ The problem to overcome is that the target attribute is deprecated and not available in XHTML 1.0 Strict. We’re not talking…

  • All I’m offering is the truth

    Jeremy Keith has published his excellent SkillSwap talk on CSS Based Design. Its real selling point is that Jeremy advocates and demonstrates how starting out with meaningful mark-up will help along your CSS. And he even manages to ape the Matrix along the way.

  • South by Southwest panel picker

    It’s still August and SxSW is already appearing over the horizon. You can buy tickets now, but the big news is that this year’s panel picker is now live. Also, we’ve got sage advice for getting the most out of dConstruct 2007.

  • CSS tabs

    Mark Pilgrim recently published his version of tabs build with HTML lists and CSS. So I thought I’d publish my version of as well.

  • Users don’t care where they are

    Mark Hurst tell us that users don’t care where they are and that breadcrumbs are nice but irrelevent. Peter Merholz wholeheartedly disagrees and Christina Wodtke provides a little balance to the argument. Incidentally, Dan Cederholm has posed the question, how best…

  • Fontastic

    Survey of installed fonts on different platforms, Mark Newhouse’s real world CSS and the Polar Bear 2 is in beta.

  • Tiger

    First impressions of Tiger (and its in-built rip-offs). Also DigitalRefueler and Mark Pilgrim’s IBM blog.

  • Real life savings through Web standards

    Following on from Doug Bowman’s recent article on potential bandwidth savings for Microsoft, in which he recounts using CSS to rebuild Microsoft’s home page, I’d like to restate here the points I made in my Ten Questions interview with the Web Standards Group.…

  • Web Typography Sucks

    So Mark and I gave our presentation yesterday at South by Southwest. The slides and some references are online, along with a recording of the session and its transcription.

  • A couple of accessibility studies

    One by Joe Clark on screen-reader usability at a redesigned, standards-compliant e-commerce site. The other by Russ Weakley and Roger Hudson on the real world interpretation of HTML table mark-up by assistive devices.

  • Free reader

    FeedReader is a nifty freeware RSS reader for Windows. Speaking of RSS, kindly read today’s Dive Into Mark on that subject [thanks to Zeldman].

  • Mark-up tactics

    Your mantra for today: ditch divs and eliminate ids for leaner, more meaningful mark-up. Now before you turn away, branding me as a slave to semantics, I will explain some of the common misconceptions to show how the number of divs and ids can easily be reduced.

  • New MySQL.com

    Anyone care to deconstruct the redesign of MySQL.com? Here?s a few starters.

  • SxSW wrap up

    Yes I know I’ve been back for nearly a week, which means you’ll be totally fed up with SxSW posts, so this one might just be for my benefit.

  • Back soon

    I’m off mountain biking for a week. In the meantime I’ve added an archive to Clagnut and made some fundamental changes to the RSS feed, discovering FeedDemon along the way.

  • Multimap redesign

    I’ve been somewhat quiet of late, which as usual means busy, busy, busy. And without further ado, the fruits of my labour can be found at Multimap.com – a complete rebuild using Web standards, semantic HTML and CSS layout.

  • Cuppa

    Over at metaGarbage, clagnut is one of Johan Svensson’s daily cups of tea. It’s always a proud moment when one is linked from folks’ homepages, but in this instance I’m even more chuffed given the select company clagnut has been placed with: Boing Boing,

  • Crease

    Under the Iron interviews Web designers. You can even ask your own questions.

  • Recent mark-up chatter

    I’ve contributed my two penn’orth to a couple of interesting HTML related posts.

  • XFN

    XHTML Friends Network is a simple piece of mark-up for identifying human relationships of links.

  • Textilisation

    Clagnut now uses a slightly customised version of Dean Allen’s wonderful Textile. Textile provides speedier text input (without having to mark up the input into my CMS) and formats the text nicely, with proper “typographer’s quotes” and so on. There…

  • West Pier on fire!

    Brighton’s poor old West Pier is on fire. Yet more trouble for the beleaguered land mark. See the BBC webcam footage. It’s now burnt down to the metal super-structure. I don’t know what can have caused the fire, but my guess is arson. The pier is…

  • Accesskey standards

    One of my goals for Clagnut is to make it accessible beyond good alt tags and valid code. Providing keyboard shortcuts through the accesskey attribute for important parts of the site, such as search, help and home, can help. It struck me that there should be consistency in…

  • Top blog tips

    Every now and then, ALA runs an article which further cements the strong relationship between its readers and its authors (who, I suspect, are also readers). I’m talking about the kind of cosy (in its most positive sense) article, written by someone who clearly gets the…

  • Far Heath Studios

    It is with great pleasure I introduce the new website for Far Heath Studios.

  • Lists, lists & more lists

    A discussion of the recent prevalence and possible overuse of heavily styled lists for such elements as site navigation and overall blog structure.

  • New browsers

    Some recent browser releases: Mozilla has released 1.3 Alpha and 1.02. Opera has released 7 for Windows Beta 2. Apple has released Safari Beta 2. For web developers, the last one is of particular note as Safari will presumably be making its way on to all new Apple machines. …

  • Four Things

    This meme is getting really irritating isn’t it?

  • iSight mounts and iMac G5s

    A gloat and a moan. I can’t mount my iSight onto my iMac (without forking out another 25 quid).

  • Normality returns

    Thanks for your support. I don’t normally get political here at Clagnut, and even less often do I get angry and sweary, so I thought I’d show any new readers what I normally write about, by way of a top ten most visited posts this fortnight.

  • HTML is better than XHTML

    Judging by the latest SitePoint TechTimes, it seems Stuart Langridge has won the argument. SitePoint’s DHTML book will be published with HTML.

  • The Ampersand Story

    Why and how I put together Ampersand, the UK’s first conference dedicated specifically to web typography.

  • Firefox 1.5 is go

    Firefox 1.5 is now a fully fledged release and it’s well worth a look, especially if you’re a web developer.

  • No mention of mark-up

    Breeze is an elegant new minimalist theme for Mozilla. Googlebar is another great add-in from mozdev (source of the afore-mentioned Checky). It’s just like the IE Google toolbar, but for Mozilla. I’m a bit of a foodie, so it won’t come as much…

  • Eliminating inline styles

    This week’s MCU web access tip recommends placing printable characters between adjacent links (such as in horizontal navigation). The tip suggests hiding the printable character using spans and inline styles. I show how to do it a little better.

  • Accessible contents menu?

    Clagnut’s global navigation is a JavaScript-driven drop down (the Site contents button graphical browsers will see top-right). An accessibility no-no, you might think, but I reckon otherwise.

  • CSS & Accessibility

    Here’s something that’s been playing on my mind recently. What role can CSS alone play in making websites accessible?