Search for ‘JavaScript’

There are 50 entries matching ‛JavaScript’:


  • Photo fades and then some

    Scott Upton of Couloir has taken things to the next level with a resizing, fading JavaScript slideshow. I’ve made some bookmarking and accessibility suggestions (picking nits as usual).

  • JavaScript-enhanced image replacement

    Most image replacement techniques work by displaying a background image of text and shifting the real text out of view which is fine unless you have images turned off. This can be addressed with some unobtrusive JavaScript.

  • Structure, presentation & behaviour

    By the miracle of coincidence, the latest issue of Digital Web has a fine article describing the issues I tried to overcome with the Clagnut drop-down menu, as discussed in my previous post.

  • Accessible contents menu?

    Clagnut’s global navigation is a JavaScript-driven drop down (the Site contents button graphical browsers will see top-right). An accessibility no-no, you might think, but I reckon otherwise.

  • old skool

    Frames and nested tables bemoan their demise: “NESTED TABLE: is there a place for us, for us maligned remnants of earlier html? We who are cast off by maturing web designers like the velveteen rabbit?” And a fine explanation of the correct use of quotation marks.…

  • XMLHttpRequest

    Just recently on Stylish Scripting, Simon Willison introduced the possibilities presented by the XMLHttpRequest extension to JavaScript:

  • Good stuff

    Good stuff on design, usability and elegant coding from Adrian Holovaty and Tantek Çelik. And Dean has introduced a great Google highlighting tool which highlights your Google search terms. See it in action here (click the top link to clagnut). Update: Cal Henderson…

  • Discovering DOM scripting

    DOM scripting is much more than getElementById. Elements can be isolated and manipulated without having an id at all. To demonstrate this I’ve put together a simple script which redefines the styles of a class.

  • Browser quirk enlightenment

    Peter Paul Koch has just released QuirksMode, a huge resource exploring, explaining and working around the vagaries of browser support for CSS and JavaScript.

  • Normality returns

    Thanks for your support. I don’t normally get political here at Clagnut, and even less often do I get angry and sweary, so I thought I’d show any new readers what I normally write about, by way of a top ten most visited posts this fortnight.

  • Recent mark-up chatter

    I’ve contributed my two penn’orth to a couple of interesting HTML related posts.

  • Accents in alerts

    Ever needed to put accented characters such as é into a JavaScript alert? It’s surprisingly problematic.

  • Ajax training workshop

    Following on from the great response we had to d.Construct, Clearleft is proud to be putting on an Ajax training course early next year.

  • Clutching at straws

    A recoding of Zeldman’s ‘previous reports’ button to use a styled link rather than a javascript-driven form button.

  • The state of accessibility in the real world

    One of the prime reasons for going to @media was to learn more from recognised experts in the field of accessibility, and yet I came away confused and disillusioned about the state of the things.

  • CSS crib sheets

    Another CSS crib sheet (on centering divs) from Andy Budd and a first A List Apart article (on creating a JavaScript image gallery) from Jeremy Keith.

  • Pixelsurgeon cured

    So taken was I with Pixelsurgeon’s invalid plight (as mentioned in the previous post) that I decided to rebuild the interview page using meaningful XHTML and CSS for all layout and presentation. The markup now validates to XHTML 1.0 and is much more useful, employing…

  • textualization

    Just been finishing off a contract left over from before my move to Multimap (going very well thank you). I’m building a site for a client (thanks Carbon) with a traditional heirarchical navigation, however the client insists that all their navigation be images. Top level…

  • Variable fixed width layout

    There’s a different approach to web page layout which is gradually getting some traction. The idea is that the layout is changed to best accommodate the window size.

  • Bulletproof Ajax

    I’m extremely proud to say my esteemed colleague, Jeremy Keith, has finished his latest book, Bulletproof Ajax. Jeremy is also running an Ajax training workshop to coincide with the book launch.

  • Don’t break the back button!

    The new W3C Validator has come out of beta and released unto the world. There is an improved UI and loads of links to the Specs, as well as help, documentation, tips and improved accessibility (accesskeys a-plenty). There also seems to have been a few changes to the…

  • Multimap is hiring

    Multimap is looking to hire a junior web designer/developer to assist the Multimap.com public site development team. The job is based in London.

  • Google’s Smart Tags

    Remember the brou ha ha when Microsoft announced its Smart Tags? Smart Tags would automatically add links into your documents, whether you liked it or not. Well Zeldman reports that the latest Google toolbar does exactly that, for example a street address will link to Google…

  • Now playing

    Until today, the listening right now bit and the last 50 listens page were generated with the help of BlogAmp, a neat little plug-in for WinAmp 2. The trouble was it only worked through JavaScript document.write statements; not exactly best practice. So I figured there…

  • spam and stuff

    A List Apart has a geeky double issue which has partly pissed me off. On the good side there’s a pretty good attempt to prevent spam bots reading email addresses which uses JavaScript and character encoding. On the disappointing side is an article explaining how to…

  • Browser stickies

    Browser Stickies is a little experiment I knocked together in the lull between SxSW Interactive and SxSW Music.

  • jQuery for UX Designers

    I’m giving a virtual seminar on using jQuery in interactive wireframes. As a UX designer, it’s the course I wish had been available to me a few years ago.

  • Fifty tunes

    I’ve added a page which lists the last 50 tunes I’ve played on WinAmp (an idea gratuitously lifted from What do I Know). It uses the BlogAmp plugin, which unfortunately requires JavaScript to view the list. However I managed to find a PHP version on the BlogAmp…

  • Photo fades

    I’ve been admiring the ‘image loading…’ and subsequent fade-in of (spectacular) photos on Couloir. It seems they use a rather nifty trick to achieve this.

  • Geotagged blogs on Multimap

    For the past month Multimap has been populating the database with geotagged blogs and now has nearly 4,000 mapped.

  • The good, the bad & the funny

    Netscape’s DevEdge has been redesigned as a standards showcase. Yes, another important web site has been redesigned and built without table-layout. Visually, it’s hardly cutting edge, but is easy on both the eye and the mouse. The drop down menus are rather splendid…

  • Glaucoma and photography

    Sorry not some wonderful cure, but instead a few sites that might be of interest: an great looking, accessible charity site and some approachs to presenting photos on web pages.

  • Mozilla DOM inspector

    Mozilla’s DOM Inspector (also available in Firefox) can seem daunting at first but is amazingly powerful. Amongst other things, it allows you to see which CSS rules are affecting any given element in order of cascade priority.

  • HTML is better than XHTML

    Judging by the latest SitePoint TechTimes, it seems Stuart Langridge has won the argument. SitePoint’s DHTML book will be published with HTML.

  • Strictly necessary?

    Dan’s latest SimpleQuiz asks the question ‘When using the XHTML 1.0 Strict doctype, how would you launch links in a new window?.’ The problem to overcome is that the target attribute is deprecated and not available in XHTML 1.0 Strict. We’re not talking…

  • Blogmarks

    Clagnut posts have been getting longer and less frequent of late, which means a bunch of sites are going noticed but unreported. So it was time to emulate the trend of a rolling list of links – hence the creation of blogmarks.

  • On fonts for the Web

    The availability of fonts for use in Web typography, or more specifically the lack thereof, has been getting some welcome attention recently.

  • Mozilla is mine

    I have recently come to the conclusion that, as a Windows user, Mozilla has ‘officially’ become my browser of choice. For some time now, we’ve known about its superior support for The Standards, so why has it taken me so long to change? Because at home I…

  • Ajax and accessibility

    There have been some great articles published recently on the accessibility of Ajax and DOM scripting.

  • The dConstruct Time Capsule

    Win a VIP ticket with the dConstruct Time Capsule, and future proof yourself with a dConstruct workshop.

  • Line breaks in tooltips

    So I was perusing the Guardian’s World Cup fixtures guide and noticed a little feature I’d never seen before: line breaks in tooltips. Also, a brief note on information design for events changing over time (goals being scored for example).

  • A matter of style

    Eric Meyer has created a rather nifty colour blending widget which calculates a palette between any two given colours. Fun (and funky JavaScript) and if nothing else, it’s useful for calculating the midpoint between two colours. Matt has posted a list of online style…

  • Bug Report, Design Engaged and PowerPoint

    PPK has a new browser resource called Bug Report. Design Engaged looked to be hugely successful and fascinating (link to a terrific animation). Veen talks about the difficulty of ditching the PowerPoint mentality.