Search for ‘Google’

There are 49 entries matching ‛Google’:


  • Google buys Measure Map

    Well I didn’t really see that coming. Jeff Veen, Product Director for Measure Map, reports that Measure Map has been acquired by Google, and according to Adaptive Path, he’s going there with it.

  • Googled me

    I’ve added a crude referrers page, showing the last fifty pages to send traffic to clagnut. Seems most of you get here from Google (not a big surprise really). Talking of such things, El Reg reports that Google has changed its page ranking algorithm, allegedly (although…

  • Yahoogle II

    A while ago I pointed that more and more, Yahoo is relying on Google for it’s search results. Tim Parkin pointed out that a Yahoo listing will give a higher Google ranking, so from that point of view being on Yahoo does still have some importance. In fact, the reason a…

  • Visual Google

    TouchGraph GoogleBrowser is a fantastic Java-based tool for visualising Google:related results. The automatic labelling is impressive in itself (the algorithm appears to work in realtime) and all the nodes are clickable to provide more information. Nice to see Clagnut has…

  • Google’s Smart Tags

    Remember the brou ha ha when Microsoft announced its Smart Tags? Smart Tags would automatically add links into your documents, whether you liked it or not. Well Zeldman reports that the latest Google toolbar does exactly that, for example a street address will link to Google…

  • Good stuff

    Good stuff on design, usability and elegant coding from Adrian Holovaty and Tantek Çelik. And Dean has introduced a great Google highlighting tool which highlights your Google search terms. See it in action here (click the top link to clagnut). Update: Cal Henderson…

  • Dang

    Google has 136 references to the phrase “ding a ding dang my dang a long ling long”. 137 by the time it gets around to indexing this page, assuming it ever does. [and 12 hours later it’s indexed] Oh, and someone should ban the use of spray deodorants,…

  • Googlerank feedback loop

    I recently started listing Google search terms with each blog post. This was done as a matter of interest, but it had an unintentional effect: the search terms fed back into Google and boosted my page rank. I explain the feedback process.

  • Website analysis tools

    In recent commentary, people have lumped together Google Analytics, Mint and Measure Map as three new traffic analysis tools all competing with each other. The reality is somewhat different.

  • Googlewhacking

    Googlewhacking may well be the latest time-wasting trend for Googlenauts, and it’s even more pointless than Googlefight. It is mildly addictive though. One locates a whack by finding two (and only two) words which, when entered into Google , receive a single result.…

  • The end to war

    Over in MacCentral there’s a few interesting thoughts from Marc Andreessen on why he thinks the browser wars are long gone and how divergence of browsing applications across different platforms is inevitable. Although quite how both the interviewer and Andreessen manage…

  • New news

    Google has just released a new News service into beta, and very clever it is too. Its news items are culled from 4,000 news sources worldwide and automatically arranged to present the most relevant news first. Individual stories are identified and links to the reporting…

  • Pop-ups of the street

    Pop-ups aren’t going away. They are leaving virtual space and manifesting themselves on our streets in blue and yellow and green bibs.

  • Yahoogle!

    Yahoo! is becoming less and less relevant by the day, as it relies more and more on Google. From the Yahoo! Help pages: You may have noticed that the Yahoo! Search results look a little different. As part of our ongoing efforts to offer you the easiest and most rewarding…

  • Give ’em what they want

    The vote for clagnut link is up. Zeldman has stopped his third party links opening in a named window. And about time too. 37 Signals have designed a better Google.

  • XMLHttpRequest

    Just recently on Stylish Scripting, Simon Willison introduced the possibilities presented by the XMLHttpRequest extension to JavaScript:

  • Right click

    Some gizmos for improving your IE5 experience. Particularly helpful for developers. Google toolbar – quicker searching, page ranking etc. Validate HTML – using WDG validator. Disable style sheets – toggle CSS to check accessibility. Web Developer Accessories…

  • No mention of mark-up

    Breeze is an elegant new minimalist theme for Mozilla. Googlebar is another great add-in from mozdev (source of the afore-mentioned Checky). It’s just like the IE Google toolbar, but for Mozilla. I’m a bit of a foodie, so it won’t come as much…

  • When good lists go bad

    First off, the css-discuss mailing list now has a searchable online archive. It’s high traffic, extremely high quality and will almost certainly already contain an answer to your CSS problems. Here are a few gems I discovered there regarding the problems with styling…

  • Four Things

    This meme is getting really irritating isn’t it?

  • Post d.Constructivism

    So d.Construct is over. It all seemed to go swimmingly well and there has been a fantastic positive response from everyone who attended.

  • Blogmarks

    Clagnut posts have been getting longer and less frequent of late, which means a bunch of sites are going noticed but unreported. So it was time to emulate the trend of a rolling list of links – hence the creation of blogmarks.

  • textualization

    Just been finishing off a contract left over from before my move to Multimap (going very well thank you). I’m building a site for a client (thanks Carbon) with a traditional heirarchical navigation, however the client insists that all their navigation be images. Top level…

  • Dropped stitch

    I must admit to rather enjoying the recent coverage of Slipknot v. The Knitting & Crochet Guild, whose quarterly journal ‘Slipknot’ is causing some consternation among black-bedecked adolescent fans of the nu-metal shock rock combo. Perhaps a Google bomb is in…

  • Tagging blogs – a Reboot of sorts

    In acknowlegement of CSS Reboot I have created Clagnut 2.0 beta in which I have started exploring APIs and thinking more about tagging.

  • Chrome just got darker

    A couple of days ago, my installation of Google Chrome updated itself from version 49 to version 50. The timing was fortuitous and relieved me of a growing text rendering headache.

  • Gmail invites

    So Keith asks ‘anyone want to clue me in as to why all I’ve been seeing around of late is Gmail, Gmail and more Gmail?’. Because, as far as I can gather, Gmail is one of the most successful and innovative viral campaigns ever.

  • blogger code

    Rather belatedly, my blogger code is: B1 d++ t++ k+ s u f+ i o+ x- e l c Google! DayPop! This is my blogchalk: English, United Kingdom, Brighton, Kemp Town, Rich, Male, 26–30!

  • Upgrade now!

    A discussion of the Upgrade Your Browser message so often placed at the top of web pages which can only displayed as intended by browsers with good CSS capabilities. Personally I find find it annoying…

  • Headings defining document structure

    Tomas Jogin has started an interesting discussion reflecting how heading level choices can give a different perception of document structure. I’m suggesting that adding hidden headings for document clarity would not be a bad thing.

  • Firefox 1.5 is go

    Firefox 1.5 is now a fully fledged release and it’s well worth a look, especially if you’re a web developer.

  • Enabling .htaccess in OS X

    Out of the box, the Apache Web server that comes with OS X does not take any notice of .htaccess files. It took me a while to figure out how to get them working, so I thought I’d share.

  • Multimap redesign

    I’ve been somewhat quiet of late, which as usual means busy, busy, busy. And without further ado, the fruits of my labour can be found at Multimap.com – a complete rebuild using Web standards, semantic HTML and CSS layout.

  • Blacklisting comment spam

    Everyone’s talking about it, everyone’s getting it: the evil that is comment spam. I have implemented a blacklist technique which I’ve added to a growing decentralised web of trust.

  • Microformats for business owners

    An explanation of the practical benefits that microformats can bring to a business and its customers, written with the business owner in mind.”

  • UK Museums on the Web 2012

    UK Museums on the Web is a one day conference organised by the Museums Computer Group. Representatives from museums and other organisations in the sector shared their experiences over the past year and beyond. These are my notes from the day.

  • Soft hyphen bug in Webkit

    Investigation into, and a fix for a peculiar bug in Mac-based Webkit browsers, including Safari and Chrome.

  • Web fonts on the horizon

    Håkon Wium Lie recently intimated that the forthcoming release of Opera will support downloadable fonts. Great news for web designers, but is it bad news for type foundries?

  • SxSW wrap up

    Yes I know I’ve been back for nearly a week, which means you’ll be totally fed up with SxSW posts, so this one might just be for my benefit.

  • A new design

    I’ve finally got around to redesigning clagnut.com.

  • Getting started with variable fonts

    Variable fonts are a new font format offering unprecedented flexibility. They will be landing in web browsers and native operating systems within 12 months. Learn how to try them out now.

  • How to use variable fonts in the real world

    Using variable fonts in the real world turns out to be tricky. This post explains how we achieved it for the new Ampersand website and what we learned along the way.

  • Scattered notes from Dots

    The inaugural Dots conference provided a very enjoyable day on the loose subject of innovation. I was in a mood to listen rather than take notes but I did jot down a few bits and bobs. Here they are made into some sentences.

  • List of pangrams

    There used to be a page on Wikipedia listing pangrams in various languages. This was deleted yesterday. Pangrams can be occasioanlly useful for designers, so I’ve resurrected the page of here, pretty much as it was in Wikipedia.