Search for ‘@font-face’

There are 50 entries matching ‛@font-face’:


  • Upcoming changes to the CSS you need for variable fonts

    Two weeks ago I was invited to Berlin for a CSS Working Group meeting. One afternoon was dedicated to resolving issues with the CSS Text and Font modules. Two resolutions in particular will affect the CSS we need to work with variable fonts.

  • WebKit now supports CSS @font-face rules

    Earlier this week it was announced that WebKit now supports CSS @font-face rules. There has been a mixed reception in some quarters, but this leap forward (for that’s what it is) has to be a good thing.

  • Whatever happened to font-stretch?

    The font-stretch property was removed from CSS2 in the transition to CSS2.1. Unfortunately this leaves us with a rather gaping hole in overall font support.

  • Web fonts on the horizon

    Håkon Wium Lie recently intimated that the forthcoming release of Opera will support downloadable fonts. Great news for web designers, but is it bad news for type foundries?

  • Moving CSS typography forward

    The CSS3 font module has come back to life, and web designers have been asked for the their wish lists. Here’s mine.

  • Getting started with variable fonts

    Variable fonts are a new font format offering unprecedented flexibility. They will be landing in web browsers and native operating systems within 12 months. Learn how to try them out now.

  • How to use variable fonts in the real world

    Using variable fonts in the real world turns out to be tricky. This post explains how we achieved it for the new Ampersand website and what we learned along the way.

  • Font embedding survey

    Thomas Phinney, Adobe’s Fonts Product Manager for & Global Typography has posted a survey asking Web designers/developers about different implementations of font-face.

  • A free font success story

    A free font has made it into MyFonts’s top ten list of best selling typefaces. There’s a lesson there somewhere.

  • Unicode Font Info

    Unicode Font Info is a really handy free application for OS X. Essentially it’s a font inspection tool with full support for Unicode 3.2, allowing you to easily navigate huge fonts with tens of thousands of supported glyphs.

  • Fonts licensed for web apps

    Following on from yesterday’s post regarding Opera’s probable support of web fonts, there comes a timely press release from font publishers, Ascender.

  • The new typography

    Why and how Web designers should be using font-family in a more adventurous manner: there are some great typefaces out there – let’s use them. The Visibone survey is an invaluable aid in typeface selection.

  • Soft hyphen bug in Webkit

    Investigation into, and a fix for a peculiar bug in Mac-based Webkit browsers, including Safari and Chrome.

  • Fontastic

    Survey of installed fonts on different platforms, Mark Newhouse’s real world CSS and the Polar Bear 2 is in beta.

  • Font-weight is still broken in all but one browser

    There’s more to the lives of many typefaces than just Bold and Regular, but almost no browsers follow the proper CSS 1 way of specifying Light, Semibold, Black and other weights. There is a workaround, but it’s nasty.

  • The trouble with font classifications

    I want to design a new way for visual designers to find fonts which specifically suit their needs and the needs of their clients. This means approaching things by way of a user-centred design process. And I need your help.

  • Problems with font rendering on Macs

    Just recently Jeffrey Zeldman was bemoaning the sub-standard state of text rendering in Firefox on a Mac. And the sad truth is he only skimmed the surface; Firefox, Safari, Opera and Camino may render even the same font differently.

  • Fontdeck is go!

    I’m extremely proud to say that two weeks ago Fontdeck opened its doors to the type-loving public. It’s been a long time in coming – too long I’d admit – but Fontdeck is now live and I’m hugely excited about what’s to come.

  • On fonts for the Web

    The availability of fonts for use in Web typography, or more specifically the lack thereof, has been getting some welcome attention recently.

  • Web Typography panel at SxSW

    I’m proud to have been part of the Web Typography panel at SxSW 2009 alongside Jon Tan, Ian Coyle, Elliot Jay Stocks & Samantha Warren. I’ve jotted down some of the topics we discussed, and some we talked about beforehand but didn’t have time for.

  • How to size text using ems

    Text for the screen is sized with CSS in terms of pixels, ems or keywords. Pixels is easy, keywords are well documented. That leaves ems. I will now attempt to show you how ems can be as quick and easy to use as pixels.

  • Skillswap went typographic

    Back in January I was part of a double bill with Jon Tan, entitled Skillswap goes typographic. It went down really well so I thought I’d better tie it all together here.

  • Face up

    Not Eric Meyer, but Eric Myer (it’s a terrific photographer’s portfolio – make sure you play with the Stereotypes). Thanks to Adactio.

  • Use rems for global sizing, use ems for local sizing

    An unedited extract from my forthcoming book, Web Typography. This chapter is quite technically focussed and hopefully stands well on its own. The other chapters I’ve written contain much higher proportion of typographic theory.

  • The Scourge of Helvetica Neue Light

    I’m no lover of Helvetica but neither do I hate it. That said I really do have an aversion to Helvetica Neue Light, or rather an aversion to when Helvetica Neue Light is used without due thought and attention, and particularly within user interfaces.

  • Chrome just got darker

    A couple of days ago, my installation of Google Chrome updated itself from version 49 to version 50. The timing was fortuitous and relieved me of a growing text rendering headache.

  • Laterz

    Tomorrow lunchtime I’m off to Morzine for ten days of Alpine mountain biking, for the third year in succession. As usual I’ve multiplied the cost of the trip by getting my grubby hands on a bunch of spanking new kit: Hope Mini disc brake, Race Face riser bars and…

  • Leading type designers love webfonts

    At Typ09, FontShop put together Webfonts Week, a series of interviews with leading type designers. There is universal support for webfonts now, even from those who were dead set against it a year ago.

  • Mark-up tactics

    Your mantra for today: ditch divs and eliminate ids for leaner, more meaningful mark-up. Now before you turn away, branding me as a slave to semantics, I will explain some of the common misconceptions to show how the number of divs and ids can easily be reduced.

  • Mo & Rob’s Drive Inne

    Having stood since the 14th Century, Ye Olde Smugglers Inne (formerly the Market Inn) was the victim of a hit and run crash in the early hours of 14th July 2004.Amazingly Maureen Scott, Landlady of 27 years, and her husband Rob, slept through the incident – to be woken…

  • Top ten tips for web typography

    The latest issue of Design Edge Canada magazine – a publication for Canada’s graphic design industry – was a web typography special for which I contributed top ten tips for web typography.

  • When good type goes bad

    Jakob mourns the demise of the text sizing buttons IE but fails to point out that it won’t have any effect on a Windows machine if text is sized in pixels. Microsoft have stopped giving away their free web fonts.

  • Squabble

    Last month Adobe and Macromedia finally settled their patent squabbles. Perhaps it went like this: Adobe BigWig: Heh, those Macromedia palettes are just like ours! Let’s sue their ass! Macromedia BigWig: That does it! Your element blending & sound technology…

  • Apostrophe s

    Why is the humble apostrophe so regularly misused and why are hairdressers so often the culprits? Ladie’s perm’s at half price (As the Guardian readers’ editor points out, journalists who should know better also get it wrong.) Apostrophes have two…

  • Two minutes silence

    At midday today, people across Europe held a two minutes silence in memory of those killed and injured a week ago in London. It was one of the most unexpectedly moving experiences I have ever had.

  • Arial 12pt

    Getting work with governmental bodies frequently involves a tedious, time consuming, tendering process with spurious clauses bad for the soul.

  • Get It

    Mozilla 1.0. Stick a fork in it. It’s done and looking good. Posted a few pikkies from the Mini Rally recently held in Brighton. Check out those wonderfully ridiculous chopped cars – why have a small car when you can have a tiny one? Like me, Owen Briggs has been…

  • Dissatisfied

    Well it seems someone isn’t too keen on The Guardian’s blog competition. Tom argues that the compo goes against the essence of blogging; that we shouldn’t be judging people’s outpouring of thoughts, emotions and ideas. On the face of it, this…

  • Googlerank feedback loop

    I recently started listing Google search terms with each blog post. This was done as a matter of interest, but it had an unintentional effect: the search terms fed back into Google and boosted my page rank. I explain the feedback process.

  • A new year, a new design

    To my surprise, Clagnut.com was last redesigned in September 2008. Well, it’s all change, with a new redesign launched today. It’s been created from the typography outwards, responsive from the beginning and elegant on huge as well as tiny screens.

  • Browse Happ(il)y

    WaSP have just released a minisite, designed by Ethan Marcotte. The purpose of Browse Happy is to spread the message to all and sundry that there are alternative browsers to Internet Explorer.

  • Web Typography Sucks

    So Mark and I gave our presentation yesterday at South by Southwest. The slides and some references are online, along with a recording of the session and its transcription.

  • HTML Entity Character Lookup

    HTML Entity Character Lookup is a little free webapp and comes a Dashboard widget too, which is super-handy.

  • Brief thoughts about web typography in 2015

    Last week Digital Arts online featured me, among others, in a piece on web fonts in 2015. My main points were twofold: more interesting treatments are required, and type designers keep giving us more fantastic materials to work with.