Mark-up techniques blog posts

  • Line breaks in tooltips

    So I was perusing the Guardian’s World Cup fixtures guide and noticed a little feature I’d never seen before: line breaks in tooltips. Also, a brief note on information design for events changing over time (goals being scored for example).

  • CSS Naked Day

    Today, April 5th, is CSS Naked Day. This means that if you are reading this on the website and not via RSS, what you are seeing is Clagnut with the CSS stripped off.

  • Easy alpha transparent pngs

    The BritPack logo on these pages is an alpha-transparent PNG and I use a little PHP script to deliver browser-specific code to IE6 and IE5.5 and a normal image to other browsers.

  • A couple of accessibility studies

    One by Joe Clark on screen-reader usability at a redesigned, standards-compliant e-commerce site. The other by Russ Weakley and Roger Hudson on the real world interpretation of HTML table mark-up by assistive devices.

  • HTML is better than XHTML

    Judging by the latest SitePoint TechTimes, it seems Stuart Langridge has won the argument. SitePoint’s DHTML book will be published with HTML.

  • Web Essentials blog

    Web Essentials is almost upon us and now it has a blog. On a vaguely related note, CSS Vault recently pointed to some demonstrations of CSS in scientific web publishing in particular rendering mathematical expressions.

  • Headings defining document structure

    Tomas Jogin has started an interesting discussion reflecting how heading level choices can give a different perception of document structure. I’m suggesting that adding hidden headings for document clarity would not be a bad thing.

  • Recent mark-up chatter

    I’ve contributed my two penn’orth to a couple of interesting HTML related posts.

  • Form layout

    Semantically speaking, should we be using tables to lay out forms, or should we be using some other mark-up combined with CSS? There arguments for both, but I reckon the most flexible answer is hidden in HTML 2.